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Activate the connection between team members.

This one is a really simple activity for ice-breakers and team introductions, and great for demonstrating the need for communications and team-working when developing virtual teams and a 'joined up' approach.  Split the group into teams of equal numbers between three and ten people. Ask the teams to stand and form into clusters. (The exercise is a test of ...

Empower teams to reach goals and fulfill their potential.

This is a simple exercise for groups between 8 and 30 people, and involves many different learning elements: understanding strategies, teamwork, presentations, argument, debate, analysis and group decision-making. The activity is based on the funny one-liner (often attributed to comedian Stephen Wright), which is deeper than first seems: "The early bird may get ...

Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

Assign a game leader for this activity. Have team members email the game leader an interesting story from their past. The story can be work related or from one's personal life. The game leader then copies all the stories into a single new email, taking care to remove any names or other details that may give away the storyteller's identity. Encourage team members ...

Activate the connection between team members.

Set Up Have group divide into pairs (or groups of three with one person as an observer) and sit on the floor back to back. Give one person the clipboard and a pencil. Give the other part of the pair the template of the shape to be drawn. DirectionsThe individual with the template has to get their partner to draw an exact duplicate of the shape drawn on their ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

Need a quick, no preparation ice breaker that works like a charm to break the ice in a meeting or training session? Highly adaptable, this ice breaker leads the participants right into the content of your meeting or training class. Here is my one word ice breaker and my suggestions about how to endlessly adapt this ice breaker to your participants' needs. One Word ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

Procedure: Ask each person to draw a flag which includes symbols or pictures describing who they are, what's important to them and/or what they enjoy. Each flag is divided into 4 or 6 segments. Each segment can contain a picture i.e. favourite emotion, favourite food, a hobby, a talent/skill, where you were born, your family etc Give everyone 20 minutes to draw ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

Step 1: Each person must make three statements about themselves, one of which isn't true. (Example: I have two brothers, I was born in Australia, I have a motorcycle). Step 2: Then the facilitator should invite to the people to exchange the answers. Step 3: The group must guess, or vote on, which statement is the tale. ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

Overview Training sessions and team building activities that involve and engage attendees are a challenge when your group meets regularly. Your participants have different levels of knowledge and need. Additionally, they have different numbers of reporting staff members and the professionalism and experience of their reporting employees ranges widely. Yet, for team ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

You can use the Pick-a-Partner ice breaker to warm up a group and enable participants at a meal to get to know each other quickly. While the ice breaker can be used to start off a day’s session, it is most effective when participants break for lunch. Several variations of the basic ice breaker are suggested so that you can add variety on different days of your ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

Divide the meeting participants into groups of four people by having them number off, one through four. Have your number ones sit with the other ones and so forth. (You do this because people generally begin a meeting by sitting with the people they already know best.) Tell the newly formed groups that their assignment is to look back over their work careers and ...
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