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Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

Set Up Everyone in the group writes down 3 questions they would like to ask others in the group. Not the normal “what’s your name” type questions but something like, "Where is the most interesting place you have ever traveled" or "Name a topic you feel absolutely passionate about".Put all the questions in a hat and ask them to the ...

Encourage the team's vision and develop the life project.

A cinquain is a type of poem and for this activity, team members will create a cinquain to encapsulate their time together. You can incorporate this into one of your final team meetings. Prior to your meeting, split your team into groups of three or four people and email them the Word Cinquain Brainstorming Worksheet. Have each group set up a conference call to ...

Entertain your team and have a good time with each other.

Spend 5 to 10 minutes brainstorming with your team to generate a list of personality traits and skills that an ideal team member would possess. Use the online collaborative tool to track ideas. Your list should contain items that would be common for any team, as well as traits unique to your specific team. Encourage team members to go beyond the obvious. After ...

Strengthen team work and identify the importance of working together to achieve goals.

This activity is a fun and challenging way to encourage the group development. Tell the team that their goal is to create a set of action photos that depicts team members interacting in a physical way, despite their distance from each other. Team members can form partnerships, small groups, or the whole team can work together. The only requirement is that two or ...

Strengthen team communication and activate the communication channels.

Set Up On a table, place as many pieces of paper with a pen as you have teams. Have pre-made simple images or "emails" made (example: Heart, Tree, Smilie Face, Star, Stickman, etc.)The players should be divided up into at least two teams with at least five people per team. Teams should have an even amount of players. Directions Have the teams line up in a straight ...

Activate the connection between team members.

This activity provides a fun way to learn more about your team members and may be done during online meetings. Preparation: Facilitator emails the attached 'Walk the Plank' sheet to each team member. The sheet needs to be completed and returned. The facts gathered will be turned into ten questions the facilitator will ask during the activity. Facilitator ...

Improve the Team Leader's abilities.

This activity is twofold: For teams with a number of newcomers to virtual meetings, team members will learn skills to help them take a leadership role and even run a virtual meeting. For teams more versed in virtual meetings, this game is a chance for team members to share something they are good at. Each team member will lead a short virtual team meeting ...

Facilitate a cultural exchange between people from different places.

With the introduction of Age Discrimination legislation (UK October 2006, and consistent with European law), there is an increased need to raise awareness and to train people about ageism and age discrimination. Here are some ideas for activities and exercises which will highlight the issues, including the 'objective justification' rules explaining certain allowable ...

Entertain your team and have a good time with each other.

This is a simple exercise to lift people out of habitual thought patterns, and to encourage deep evaluation of personal aims, values, purpose and meaning. For groups of any size. Encourage post-activity feedback, review, sharing and discussion (or not), as appropriate, depending group/teams size, facilitators and time available. Encourage and enable follow-up ...

Care for the team's health and give them a comfortable environment to reduce stress.

Game SummaryThe Johari Window was invented by Joseph Luft and Harrington Ingham in the 1950s as a model for mapping personality awareness. By using a fixed list of adjectives, such as bold, confident, extroverted, and energetic to describe yourself and then asking your friends and colleagues to do the same, you can build a grid of overlap and difference. This ...
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