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Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

Set Up Everyone in the group writes down 3 questions they would like to ask others in the group. Not the normal “what’s your name” type questions but something like, "Where is the most interesting place you have ever traveled" or "Name a topic you feel absolutely passionate about".Put all the questions in a hat and ask them to the ...

Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

Ask participants to form a circle and the leader asks a series of incomplete sentences to each person in the group one after the other. The idea is that if there is not enough time to think too much, spontaneous and honest answers will be given. Try to have enough sentences to have at least two rounds.   Variation: For very large groups and where time ...

Activate the connection between team members.

Split groups into teams of between three and six people. Provide the following instruction to group/teams: You have five minutes to discover an interesting, surprising and separate connection you share with each person in your team. (A different connection with each person, not a single connection that every team member shares.) 'Interesting and surprising' ...

Strengthen team work and identify the importance of working together to achieve goals.

This activity is an excellent icebreaker. It introduces problem-solivng and a small amount of conflict for your team to work through. Open the online collaborative document and type a list of numbers equal to the number of people on your team. Tell the team you will be calling out a category, and they have to "line up" in order, based on the category (example, by ...

Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

In the talent management universe, the new employee orientation and mainstreaming process is known as “employee onboarding.” Keeping in mind that you never get a second chance to make a first impression, your business should make absolutely sure that new hires feel welcomed, valued, and prepared for what lies ahead during your new employee orientation or ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

Divide the meeting participants into groups of four people by having them number off, one through four. Have your number ones sit with the other ones and so forth. (You do this because people generally begin a meeting by sitting with the people they already know best.) Tell the newly formed groups that their assignment is to look back over their work careers and ...

Break the ice with team members and encourage a healthy virtual working environment.

You can use the Pick-a-Partner ice breaker to warm up a group and enable participants at a meal to get to know each other quickly. While the ice breaker can be used to start off a day’s session, it is most effective when participants break for lunch. Several variations of the basic ice breaker are suggested so that you can add variety on different days of your ...

Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

Welcoming a new employee is more than making a company announcement and a boss assignment. Welcoming a new employee, to give the new employee the best possibility of integrating successfully in your company, requires a series of steps that start after your job offer is accepted. These welcoming steps for the new employee continue right into his or her employment. If ...

Strengthen team communication and activate the communication channels.

Previously to the activity, the facilitator should select and sort out an image about the topic that he prefers, hopefully relative to the team. One team member will describe the image to the rest of the team without the benefit of two-way communication. Send the attached image to one team member. Have all other participants get a paper and pen. The team member ...

Introduce new teams and/or team members and foster communication.

Intro 140 is a very brief way to introduce team members to each other, patterned after Twitter's "140-character-or-less" messages. Before your team meeting, assign each team member a partner and instruct him or her to call their partner for a one-on-one "get to know you" conversation prior to the next team meeting. At the conclusion of their conversation, each ...
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